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Turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, and car care

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Category:Car & Maintenance Tips

There is no better way to give thanks, to what some consider a member of the family - their car - than to have it thoroughly inspected before hitting the road for Thanksgiving.

The Car Care Council recently issued a report urging those driving for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend to have their vehicles looked at before hitting the road. A quick checkup can save loads of time, money and hassle, if a car happens to break down miles away from home. In addition, car owners should install Husky Liners® car floor mats to keep the leftover mashed potatoes off a car's carpet if they tragically happened to spill on the ride home.

"A pre-trip vehicle check provides peace of mind, helping reduce the chance of costly car trouble and providing an opportunity to have any repairs performed by one's own trusted technician before hitting the road," said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. "While no inspection can guarantee a car's performance, it's comforting to know proper precautions were taken to ensure a stress-free Thanksgiving road trip."

The Car Care Council said motorists should have their fluids, belts and hoses, lighting and windshield wipers checked before heading out and reminded them to restock a car's emergency kit, because you never know when leftover turkey might need a syringe for a little extra basting on the long drive home. 

AAA recently said that they expect 43.6 million Americans to travel 50 miles or more from their homes during the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, up 0.7 percent from people who traveled last year and marking the fourth consecutive year where Thanksgiving weekend travel has increased.

It's too bad cars don't run on turkey gravy because there will be no shortage of that fueling the American masses this upcoming holiday. Until somebody figures out the conversion for enabling hybrids to run on leftover Thanksgiving day corn, we will all be stuck using inedible gasoline for the rides to and from dinner.

So, since it's unfortunately still relevant, the price for the distasteful fuel is expected to be between $3.25 and $3.40 throughout the weekend. Although gas this year could be as high as it's ever been during Thanksgiving, it could be much worse considering gas prices have fallen nearly 40 cents since the beginning of October.

Even if the seat belt might be just a little bit tighter on the way home, be sure to buckle up.

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